Tag Archives: Curry

Recipe: Tandoori Salmon with Mango Salsa

Tandoori Salmon with Mango Salsa
Tandoori Salmon with Mango Salsa

Ingredients;

For the Salmon:

100g natural yoghurt
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1 level teaspoon tandoori masala paste
Juice of half a lemon
1 teaspoon grated ginger
1 chilli, finely diced
2 salmon fillets, skin on

For the Salsa:

1 mango, peeled and diced
1 cucumber, diced
1 onion, diced
1 chilli, seeds removed, finely diced
1 tablespoon finely chopped mint
Juice of half a lemon

Serves 2


I’ve been slowly introducing more hot dishes (hot as in spicy hot) to both myself and Elly’s palate and my first experiment with this dish was the first time that a dish sent us scrambling for glasses of milk to cool down with. Thankfully I’ve played around with the amount of tandoori masala paste in the recipe to lessen that effect and we’ve both been enjoying it since.

The tandoori masala paste called for in this recipe can be a little difficult to source in Ireland, outside of an Asian supermarket, however you can substitute almost any Indian Curry paste if you cannot source tandoori masala.

To start with you will need to marinate the fish, so mix the yoghurt, garlic, tandoori curry paste, the juice from half a lemon, ginger and the diced chilli together in a small bowl. Next pop your salmon in and make sure that it is well coated. Cover it and place in the fridge for at least twenty minutes.

Next, mix the salsa ingredients together, cover and keep in the fridge until ready to serve.

After the salmon has had time to marinate you want to grill it under a very hot grill. Grill the skin side first for four to five minutes until the edges just start to blacken then turn them over and do the same on the other side.

Once the Fish is ready serve on a bed of boiled rice with a generous dollop of salsa and enjoy. Just keep a glass of milk handy just in case you find it a bit hot for your taste buds 😉

Recipe: Sweet Chicken Curry

Sweet Chicken Curry served on a bed of rice
Sweet Chicken Curry served on a bed of rice

Ingredients;

4 chicken breasts, diced
2 medium onions, finely diced
2 cloves of garlic, finely diced
2 chilies, finely diced
A thumb-sized piece of ginger, finely diced (or half a teaspoon of ground ginger)
80g butter
1 teaspoon turmeric
500ml of hot water
Half teaspoon of ground coriander
50g salted peanuts
40g raisins

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I like to use those “generic” chilli peppers you see in most supermarkets these days as they don’t give a lot of heat. This brings all the other flavours to the forefront and allows you to really enjoy them more than any curry I’ve ever tasted.

If you prefer your curry a little hotter, then you can adjust the strength of the chilli that you use, we’ve made this same recipe with Scotch bonnets and found that the extra heat changes the flavours and gives you a curry flavour not unlike the chicken curry you’d get down your local Chinese restaurant.

Fry the onion, garlic and peanuts in the butter until they start to colour (approx 10 Min.). Then add chili, ginger and turmeric and stir well.

Now, add the chicken and allow this to cook until it starts to brown. Follow this with the water and raisins, cover your pot and bring to a gentle simmer. Keep simmering until the sauce has reduced by half, stirring occasionally. (approx. 20-30 Min.)

Once the sauce has reduced then you’re ready to serve on a bed of fresh boiled rice.

Giving new life to an old recipe

This next recipe is based on one I found in an old cookbook – “Recipes of All Nations” by Countess Morphy, published in 1935. History is a little murky, but it appears that she wasn’t a countess at all and may not have travelled the world either! The book is still an excellent read and a historical curiosity and we’d like to thank our friend Will for lending it to us.

According to Countess Morphy:

The recipes I have selected for curries, dopiazas and koftas are chiefly from Northern India, as these are less hot and more adapted to English tastes.

My how times have changed since 1935 :) And it’s not just the English tastes either, I made some significant changes to the original recipe, as it had more than double the amount of butter and a huge amount of salt. My new recipe gives more or less the same flavour but with less than half the butter and the only salt in it is from the salt in the butter and on the peanuts. It should leave your heart a little happier than the original recipe.

I also added salted peanuts and raisins to the recipe. The peanuts give all the salt the dish needs and the combination of both gives a really interesting texture.

I remember the first time I made this curry, I was stunned by the subtle flavours, the lack of heat and just how easy it was to prepare. Even if you’re a hardened curry fanatic that likes their curry “centre of the sun” hot I’d urge you try this recipe, even once just to experience the flavour.