Tag Archives: World Cuisines

Gino’s Tiramisu

Yesterday, I mentioned that Gino made tiramisu as part of his demonstration at Taste of Dublin and thanks to the wonder that is modern camera phone technology today we bring you *ahem* a guest recipe from one of the worlds best known chefs 😉

Giving new life to an old recipe

This next recipe is based on one I found in an old cookbook – “Recipes of All Nations” by Countess Morphy, published in 1935. History is a little murky, but it appears that she wasn’t a countess at all and may not have travelled the world either! The book is still an excellent read and a historical curiosity and we’d like to thank our friend Will for lending it to us.

According to Countess Morphy:

The recipes I have selected for curries, dopiazas and koftas are chiefly from Northern India, as these are less hot and more adapted to English tastes.

My how times have changed since 1935 :) And it’s not just the English tastes either, I made some significant changes to the original recipe, as it had more than double the amount of butter and a huge amount of salt. My new recipe gives more or less the same flavour but with less than half the butter and the only salt in it is from the salt in the butter and on the peanuts. It should leave your heart a little happier than the original recipe.

I also added salted peanuts and raisins to the recipe. The peanuts give all the salt the dish needs and the combination of both gives a really interesting texture.

I remember the first time I made this curry, I was stunned by the subtle flavours, the lack of heat and just how easy it was to prepare. Even if you’re a hardened curry fanatic that likes their curry “centre of the sun” hot I’d urge you try this recipe, even once just to experience the flavour.

Recipe: Memphis Soul Stew

Hahaa April Fool! :)

Obvious? maybe a little but what the heck, this track also acts as an introduction to the next month’s recipes.

In case you haven’t made the connection yet, I’m diving into the world of Soul Food. A style of cooking most associated with the American deep south, however it is, what I like to call, a hybrid cuisine whose roots can be traced to Africa, the southern Indian tribes and even has hints of the Cajun and Creole styles.

It’s also a style that “inspired” a lot of junk food, think deep fried chicken and fish, in particular. So you’d be forgiven for thinking that it doesn’t really sit right on a site called Not Junk Food, but you’d be wrong. With a little care in the ingredients and the cooking, even deep fried food can be part of a healthy balanced diet. That said, these recipes are (mostly) best kept as treats and for special occasions.

If you’d like to learn more about the history of Soul Food I’d strongly recommend this Wikipedia article. Either way, I’ll be posting some of my thoughts and memories of Soul Food over the next few weeks.